My first Mayflower passenger, Constance Hopkins (1606-1677)

30Jan10

Constance Hopkins was born in England in 1606, and came to America on the Mayflower in 1620, landing at Plymouth Rock.

Although Constance is not a direct ancestor, but rather a cousin’s inlaw, she is the first person I have been able to place on my tree who came over on the Mayflower.

Constance Hopkins is my 1st cousin 10 times removed’s wife’s great-grandmother.

She was only 14 when she came across with her father Stephen Hopkins and her step mother Elizabeth Fisher. What a journey that must have been.

At about 10 years old I made a trip to the Plymouth Plantation living history museum. At first it was fun and exciting. Everything was different but surprisingly familiar. I was even asked by an old man to help him catch a chicken. I scrambled around the fenced-in yard after that darn chicken, eventually grabbing a leg (and cutting my hand). I handed the struggling chicken to the man, who promptly wrung its neck, laid it across a stump, and took off its head with an axe. The rest of the day suddenly wasn’t as much fun. To this day I am still mildly traumatized by the unexpectedness of that death, which I unwittingly aided.

Jerry Milo Johnson to Constance Hopkins, Mayflower passenger

Advertisements


6 Responses to “My first Mayflower passenger, Constance Hopkins (1606-1677)”

  1. 1 Stella

    This is my 10th great grandmother through her son Jabez Snow.

  2. 2 sheran walker

    Constance is my 10th great grandmother through her son Anthony Snow and wife Abigail Warren.

  3. 3 Dawne

    Also, 10th Great Grandmother through her daughter Elizabeth Snow & h., Thomas Rogers (grandson of Thomas Rogers pilgrim)
    Constance m. Nicholas Snow (he came in 1623 on the Anne)

    • 4 Deborah Copeland

      Constance is also my 10th great grandmother through her son John Snow.

  4. 5 Sheri

    Constance is my 9th Great Grandmother through her son Mark and his wife Jane Prence daughter of Governer Thomas Prence.

  5. 6 Ann Brown

    Also 10th Great Grandmother through Sara Snow and William Walker


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: